ANALYZING YOUR GOALS AND YOUR AUDIENCE

ANALYZING YOUR GOALS AND YOUR AUDIENCE

Before writing a resume and letter of application, you must  your goals and your  for these critical documents Understanding Your Goals Your resume and letter of application have two goals: to get an interview and to indicate the skills you will bring to the company. The letter and resume open the way to an interview, and if you can present your strengths and experiences convincingly in these key documents, the employers will ask you for an interview. To be convincing, you must explain writing what you can do for the reader; you must show how your strengths meet the firm’s needs.

The letter and resume also provide topics for discussion at an interview. It is not uncommon for an interv iewer to say something like, “You say in your resume that you worked with material requirements planning. Would you explain to us what you did Understanding Your Audience The audio for your resume and letter could be any of a number of people in an organization, from the personnel manager to a division manager.  could be just one person or a committee. Whoever they are, they will approach the letter with a limited amount of time and with expectations about writing skills and professional presentation. The Reader’s. Time Employers read letters and resumes quickly. A manager might have one hundred resumes and letters to review. If the manager spent an hour on each one, it would take 2 112 weeeks to read th-rn all. Managers do not have that kind of time. It is much more likely ‘nat, on the initial reading, the manager will spend 30 seconds to 3 minutes on each application, quickly sorting the applications into “yes” and “no” piles.

Skill Expectations Managers look for data that show how the applicant will satisfy the company’s needs. The data, according to two researchers, should include “the college graduate’s previous achievements; special aptitudes skills and work-related learning, contributions, and achievements” (Harcourt and Krizar 183). Suppose, for instance, that applicants are responding to an ad specifying need experience in materials resource planning.The manager will reject any applications that do not give evidence of such a skill.

Professional Expectations Managers read to discover your ability to write clearly, to handle detail, and to act professionally. Clean, neat documents written in clear, correct English demonstrate all three of these. Bad grammar, unclear sentences, spelling mistakes, typographical errors, erasures, and poor-quality paper will probably offend a manager.